Science Tidbits #4

From Astronomy to Zoology, from Bathyspheres to O'Neill Colonies, the wonders of discovery and invention are on topic here.

Moderator: RJDiogenes

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby huggle » Thu Feb 16, 2017 6:05 am

possibly, in the baby-years of the planet. I doubt it always had such a solid orbit. If it had, wouldn't it be more disk-shaped due to the gravitational forces while it cooled down?
Btw, magnetic pole switches are no fun either, because during the switch we'd be completely unprotected from the radiation and particle-rain from space (solar storms etc). That would inevitably lead to a raise in mortality from cancer and other DNA-mutations/aberrations.

Lupine, do you happen to have a source at hand about the last field reversal's date? I seem to remember it was during the dinosaur era, shortly after the first mammals appeared, but it's been decades since I last read up on the topic.
a hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away
User avatar
huggle
Censor
Censor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:40 am
Location: Bavaria

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Orpheus » Thu Feb 16, 2017 7:15 am

For the past 20 million years, pole reversals have averaged 200,000-300,000 years apart.

For comparison, the Jurassic began over 200,000,000 years ago (1000x as long) and the Triassic (which many call the real dinosaur era) began more than 250,000,000 years ago. H. sapiens *may* go back as far as 200,000 years

Magnetic Pole Reversal Happens All The (Geologic) Time [NASA]
Orpheus
Citizen
Citizen
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 2:31 pm

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Thu Feb 16, 2017 4:12 pm

scottydog wrote:Lupine, do you happen to have a source at hand about the last field reversal's date? I seem to remember it was during the dinosaur era, shortly after the first mammals appeared, but it's been decades since I last read up on the topic.

What Orpheus said.

Orpheus wrote:For the past 20 million years, pole reversals have averaged 200,000-300,000 years apart.

For comparison, the Jurassic began over 200,000,000 years ago (1000x as long) and the Triassic (which many call the real dinosaur era) began more than 250,000,000 years ago. H. sapiens *may* go back as far as 200,000 years

Genus Homo goes back around 2 million years so our ancestors have survived numerous magnetic pole reversals. Slightly off subject with the Triassic, actually proto-mammals dominated the earliest parts of that era.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:20 pm

I think the last poll reversal was last November. Whether we survive remains to be seen. :lol:

scottydog wrote:
RJDiogenes wrote:As long as the geographic poles don't flip we should be okay.

Has that every happened?

I was kidding, but it's not impossible-- very unlikely, though, at this point. As huggle said, it would be more likely during the formation of the system or as the result of a cataclysmic event (like whatever knocked Uranus halfway over). But there's really too much inertia for us to physically tip over.
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby huggle » Sun Feb 19, 2017 2:27 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:I think the last poll reversal was last November. Whether we survive remains to be seen. :lol:

A German writer and philosopher (iirc it was Berthold Brecht) said "every people has the government they deserve". I don't think the Americans are *that* bad. Just a trifle foolish, maybe. You're not the only ones, though: Hitler was elected just as legally and he too published his general ideas beforehand. The problem about lunatic politicians is that everyone finds them diverting or ridiculous at first and doesn't think they'll manage to put their ideas into practize. Sadly, they do very effectively. Hitler used a "national emergency law" to overrule the parliament. It might be wise to keep Trump from anything that might count as such an emergency for I believe your constitution contains the same loophole that ours did in 1939.
a hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away
User avatar
huggle
Censor
Censor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:40 am
Location: Bavaria

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Sun Feb 19, 2017 5:40 pm

I can't think of any such loophole. The Founding Fathers were big on checks and balances, not so big on authoritarianism. But they also weren't big on political parties, but the electoral system they created has a tendency to encourage a partisan bipolar electorate, which they did not foresee. There are ways to reform the process to prevent that, but even after this I'm not hearing a lot of support for it.

And also keep in mind that Trump got in through a glitch in that same electoral process. Actually only about 22% of the eligible voters supported him and many-- as CNN put it-- "held their noses and voted." He came into office with historically low levels of support and has not exactly been greeted warmly by the citizenry.
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:34 pm

Found a website where you can help find Planet 9!
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:49 pm

I already know where Pluto is. :angel:

That was pretty cool. I just found seventeen new planets. :D

Seriously, though, that's one tough assignment. I'll bet they get a lot of false positives. :loopy:
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:02 pm

I marked 2 out of around 7 or 8 images, but in all reality they're probably nothing.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby huggle » Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:23 am

Cool website! Thanks for sharing. Didn't find anything but stars at a first glance but I'll keep it bookmarked.
I used to be a regular at SETI ever since it started in the 70s as a screensaver but I quit when they switched to a packet-style software and my PC suddenly couldn't properly converse with their computer anymore.
a hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away
User avatar
huggle
Censor
Censor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:40 am
Location: Bavaria

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:46 pm

I never did that because I share this computer with my Uncle's business. But I suppose I could just run it at night. I'd love to be the one to find some little green men. :saucer:
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:18 pm

I should look into that. I'm still hoping to find Planet 9 on the other website (I even have a name picked out). I only found one "dipole" today though.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:32 pm

You get to name it if you find it? I shall redouble my efforts. :lab:

Have you seen this? :unsure:
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:36 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:You get to name it if you find it? I shall redouble my efforts. :lab:

Probably not, but if I was asked I'd name it "Luperca" for the wolf that nursed Romulus and Remus. It also resembles "Lupine" :D

Have you seen this? :unsure:

Came across that yesterday and I've been in a wait and see mode as NASA has a tendency to over-hype these news conferences.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby huggle » Wed Feb 22, 2017 6:04 am

it'd be cool if yor Lupercula had 2 moons :)

Usually, the finder gets to name the celestial object. Only in case of comets they name them after the finder (like Shoemaker-Levi 9 that crashed on Jupiter in 1994). There's a convention that planets or planetary objects within our own solar system are to be named after terrestrial deities.
a hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away
User avatar
huggle
Censor
Censor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:40 am
Location: Bavaria

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Wed Feb 22, 2017 6:22 pm

And now we know what NASA was hyping about. While not as exciting as some had hoped the new worlds found around TRAPPIST-1 are extraordinary and do offer a wonderful opportunity to study the environments of various worlds, a couple of which might harbor life.

And Space.com's take on it.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Wed Feb 22, 2017 11:14 pm

Yeah, I was hoping they had managed a spectral analysis of some planet and found water or oxygen. But this is pretty amazing. A little solar system that's more like Jupiter and its moons than our system-- what an incredibly interesting sky those planets must have, with a huge sun in the sky and a bunch of other nearby planets zipping around. I'd love to see a simulation of that. And in just a couple of years they should be able to to get information about their atmosphere. And 40 light years is not that far. Hopefully SETI will take a look at them as well.

Lupine wrote:Probably not, but if I was asked I'd name it "Luperca" for the wolf that nursed Romulus and Remus. It also resembles "Lupine" :D

That's a good one. I don't remember that ever being used before.

huggle wrote:There's a convention that planets or planetary objects within our own solar system are to be named after terrestrial deities.

I've always liked Persephone as the name of a tenth (or ninth) planet, which is a name that was used by Arthur C Clarke and some others.
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Wed Feb 22, 2017 11:22 pm

^There's also an asteroid named that.

RJDiogenes wrote:
Lupine wrote:Probably not, but if I was asked I'd name it "Luperca" for the wolf that nursed Romulus and Remus. It also resembles "Lupine" :D

That's a good one. I don't remember that ever being used before.

It's a fairly obscure reference.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Thu Feb 23, 2017 4:51 pm

There's another attempt to make Pluto a planet again. Probably won't work and even I think their definition of "planet" might be too broad. Personally I'm OK with the "dwarf planet" designation. It would fit well with terrestrial, gas giant, and ice giant definitions.[beating dead horse] But to call an object a "dwarf planet" while simultaneously insisting that it's not really a planet is decidedly silly [/beating dead horse].
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:52 pm

They do a good job of pointing out the problems with the IAU definition, particularly the zone clearing nonsense. But their definition is definitely too loose. One thing that would be useful to import from the IAU definition is the phrase, "without being a moon of another object." So the definition then would be:

1. Has achieved hydrostatic equilibrium.
2. Does not undergo fusion reactions.
3. Is not a moon of another sub-stellar object.

That would cover everything that could reasonably be called a planet in our Solar System, in other systems, and in between systems.
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:01 pm

^Way too simple and easy to understand! :lol:
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Fri Feb 24, 2017 10:52 pm

Guess I'm not a rocket scientist. :lol: :saucer:
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby Lupine » Sat Feb 25, 2017 4:32 pm

NASA is considering adding a crew to their new capsule.

No.

They should NOT do this.

I'm as much of a wank for manned spaceflight as anybody, but this strikes me as unnecessarily risky. Especially if Trump is pushing for it.
User avatar
Lupine
Consul
Consul
 
Posts: 25556
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:33 pm
Location: The State of Insanity

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby huggle » Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:40 am

RJDiogenes wrote:1. Has achieved hydrostatic equilibrium.
2. Does not undergo fusion reactions.
3. Is not a moon of another sub-stellar object.

That would cover everything that could reasonably be called a planet in our Solar System, in other systems, and in between systems.

That definition would also apply to a burned-out sun. Therefore I'd like to add
4. orbits a sun or used to orbit a sun
The latter point is to cover planets that have been thrown out of their orbit by novas or other big gravitational influences.
But even that definition could also apply to other roundish and periodical objects in our solar system, like for example Ceres.

Lupine wrote:NASA is considering adding a crew to their new capsule.

As long as they shoot Trump up with it, I wouldn't mind much. On the other hand, it'd be unethical to inflict that man onto other species.
a hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away
User avatar
huggle
Censor
Censor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 4:40 am
Location: Bavaria

Re: Science Tidbits #4

Postby RJDiogenes » Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:20 pm

Lupine wrote:They should NOT do this.

I agree. It's an unjustifiable risk to the astronauts. And it will only result in more delays.

huggle wrote:That definition would also apply to a burned-out sun.

Well, the second item was intended to mean could not and never has undergone fusion. I should have worded it better.

The latter point is to cover planets that have been thrown out of their orbit by novas or other big gravitational influences.

Yes, I wanted the definition to include rogue planets, which is why I didn't mention orbiting a star. But I wonder if all rogue planets used to orbit stars or if any formed freely in the interstellar medium.

But even that definition could also apply to other roundish and periodical objects in our solar system, like for example Ceres.

Oh, yes, by my definition, Ceres would be classified as a planet, as would several other known trans-Neptunian objects.

As long as they shoot Trump up with it, I wouldn't mind much.

The problem is that they'd have to bring him back. :lol:
Please visit My Store and My Gallery and My YouTube Page. :)

:grape:
User avatar
RJDiogenes
Imperator
Imperator
 
Posts: 45572
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 am
Location: Boston

PreviousNext

Return to Science and Technology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest